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From the AICR Test Kitchen
Week of April 18, 2011
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Contact: Alice Bender, (202) 328-7744

Zesty Asian Turkey and Mango Stir-fry

from the
American Institute for Cancer Research

Put some zest and color into the spring season with this healthy, easy to prepare dish, featuring the great taste of mangoes and the wonderful benefits of turkey and broccoli. Stir-frying enables you to create a delicious and nutritious meal quickly with a lot of flavor and minimal fat.

Key to the recipe is the fish sauce, a condiment that helps give it an Asian flavor. It’s commonly used in Thai dishes. Also called, “Nam Pla,” fish sauce has a rich translucent reddish-golden brown color. Good fish sauces are allowed to ferment for 12 to 18 months. Anchovies are often used, but some fish sauces are made from other types of fish or even squid.

The mango, which originated in Southeast Asia over 4,000 years ago, adds a rich measure of fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. The enzymes in mangoes are very good tenderizing agents.

Select the best ripe mangoes by both smelling and gently squeezing. A ripe mango has robust fruity aroma emitting from the stem end, and they are ready to eat when they yield to a soft touch, much like a ripe peach.

Choose mangos that are plump and heavy for their size with the right fragrance. The color may be green, yellow, red and orange or any combination. After the skin is removed, the golden pulp adds stunning color and a somewhat sweet quality to the stir-fry. Although texture can vary, it’s similar to a ripe plum.

Canola oil, with its high smoke point, is the perfect oil for preparing this recipe. You can experiment and create the level of zest you like by sprinkling in the preferred amount of red pepper flakes to complement the cilantro, basil and mint.

So enjoy some great fruit taste and nutritional value in a dish that features the time saving and health benefits of quick frying.

Turkey Stir Fry

Zesty Asian Turkey and Mango Stir-fry

  • 2 Tbsp. fish sauce
  • 3 Tbsp. lime juice
  • 1 tsp. cornstarch
  • 1 tsp. brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. canola oil, divided
  • 1 lb. turkey fillets, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp. minced ginger
  • 1/4-1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper or to taste
  • 4 cups small broccoli florets
  • 1/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth, water may be substituted
  • 2 mangoes, peeled and sliced
  • 5 scallions, cut into 1-inch pieces, including green stems
  • 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint
  • 6 lime wedges

Combine fish sauce, lime juice, cornstarch and brown sugar in a mixing bowl. Set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large skillet or wok over high heat. Add turkey, stirring frequently until cooked through, about 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer to plate and set aside.

Add remaining oil, garlic, ginger and red pepper to skillet or wok. Cook, stirring constantly, for 30 seconds or less.

Add broccoli and broth. Cook, stirring constantly, until broccoli begins to soften, about 2 minutes. Add mangoes and scallions. Cook, stirring constantly, for about 1 minute.

Add the fish sauce mixture and turkey. Cook, stirring constantly, until the sauce thickens and the turkey is heated through, about 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in cilantro, basil and mint.

Serve with lime wedges.

Makes 6 servings.

Per serving: 200 calories, 6 g total fat (<1 g saturated fat), 18 g carbohydrate, 21 g protein,
2.5 g dietary fiber, 548 mg sodium.

***

The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) is the cancer charity that fosters research on the relationship of nutrition, physical activity and weight management to cancer risk, interprets the scientific literature and educates the public about the results. It has contributed more than $100 million for innovative research conducted at universities, hospitals and research centers across the country. AICR has published two landmark reports that interpret the accumulated research in the field, and is committed to a process of continuous review. AICR also provides a wide range of educational programs to help millions of Americans learn to make dietary changes for lower cancer risk. Its award-winning New American Plate program is presented in brochures, seminars and on its website, www.aicr.org. AICR is a member of the World Cancer Research Fund International.

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