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From the AICR Test Kitchen
Week of March 17, 2014
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Contact: Alice Bender, (202) 328-7744

Kale Frittata with Tomato and Basil

from the
American Institute for Cancer Research

This wonderfully versatile frittata is basically Italy’s version of an omelet. For Italians, making frittatas is a tasty way to enjoy vegetables that are in season and use leftovers. In March one of the nutritional powerhouses that is fresh and plentiful is kale – and this recipe enables you to enjoy it in an unusual way.

Kale, which has been cultivated for over two millennia, was the most widely eaten green vegetable in Europe until the Middle Ages, when cabbage became more popular. It was particularly prominent in cold climates due to its hardiness. In Scotland kail was so plentiful it was even a generic term for dinner. For this recipe baby kale works well, but you can just as easily use the regular variety if it is chopped into small bite-size pieces and cooked properly.

After the kale and onion are softened it is important to turn the heat down to medium to medium-low to ensure that the eggs cook slowly to maintain a moist quality. Some chefs stir all the Parmesan cheese into the egg mixture, but this recipe calls for some to be sprinkled on top allowing for it to brown lightly under the broiler to further accentuate its great taste. This easy to make frittata is finished in the oven, so you will need an ovenproof skillet.

Frittatas are a great way to eat your seasonal vegetables at breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Kale Frittata

Kale Frittata with Tomato and Basil

  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped kale
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • 9 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan or Romano cheese, divided
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 cup halved cherry tomatoes
  • 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh basil or 1/2 tsp. dried basil, or to taste

 

In 9-inch or 10-inch iron, nonstick or regular, ovenproof skillet heat oil over medium-high heat. (If using a regular or cast iron skillet, make sure sides are coated with oil.) Sauté kale and onion until wilted, about 3 minutes.

In large bowl, whisk together eggs, half of cheese, salt and pepper.

Stir kale and onion into egg mixture and then return egg mixture to skillet. Sprinkle in tomatoes, basil and remaining cheese. Turn heat down to medium to medium-low and cook uncovered for 10-12 minutes or until frittata is just about set. While cooking, pre-heat broiler.

Remove skillet from burner and place under oven broiler until frittata top turns light golden brown, about 1 minute. Remove from broiler and let frittata rest a minute before cutting into wedges. Serve hot, cold or at room temperature.

Makes 6 servings.

Per serving: 168 calories, 11 g total fat (4 g saturated fat),
4 g carbohydrate, 12 g protein, < 1g dietary fiber, 289 mg sodium

***

The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) is the cancer charity that fosters research on the relationship of nutrition, physical activity and weight management to cancer risk, interprets the scientific literature and educates the public about the results. It has contributed more than $100 million for innovative research conducted at universities, hospitals and research centers across the country. AICR has published two landmark reports that interpret the accumulated research in the field, and is committed to a process of continuous review. AICR also provides a wide range of educational programs to help millions of Americans learn to make dietary changes for lower cancer risk. Its award-winning New American Plate program is presented in brochures, seminars and on its website, www.aicr.org. AICR is a member of the World Cancer Research Fund International.


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