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AICR Health-e-Recipes
September 21, 2010 | Issue 315
Pacific Halibut

Add Some Mediterranean Flavor

Pacific Halibut with Olives and Tomatoes

Add some Mediterranean flavor – and a health boost - to your table with this week's Health-e-Recipe. Tomatoes are rich in vitamin C and lycopene that act together as antioxidants to help lower risk for some cancers. The halibut packs protein and omega-3 fats that can help foster a healthy heart and promote health in other ways.

Makes 4 servings.
Per serving: 270 calories, 12 g total fat (trace saturated fat), 14 g carbohydrate, 26 g protein, 3 g dietary fiber, 470 mg sodium.
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 large onions, chopped
  • 1 medium green bell pepper, chopped
  • 20 large black olives, pitted
  • 1 14-ounce can plum tomatoes, chopped
  • 4 halibut fillets, 4 oz each (any dense white fish will do)
  • 1/2 tsp. Italian seasoning
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
  • Chopped parsley to garnish

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. In medium skillet heat 1 tablespoon olive oil. Sauté garlic, onion and pepper until softened.
  3. Add olives and tomatoes and simmer for about 5 minutes.
  4. Set aside.
  5. Gently wash fish and pat dry. Season with Italian seasoning, salt and pepper on both sides.
  6. Heat remaining olive oil in large skillet over high heat. Cook fish for about 3 to 4 minutes on each side. When turning fish take care to keep fillets in one piece.
  7. Place fish in baking dish and cover with the sauce. Sprinkle parsley on top.
  8. Bake for about 10 - 20 minutes until fish is cooked through.
  9. Garnish with chopped parsley and serve over a bed of brown or wild rice.

Grocery list

Olive oil
Garlic
Onions
Green bell pepper
Black olives, pitted
Canned plum tomatoes
Halibut fillets
Italian seasoning
Fresh parsley

 

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Did You Know?

The phytochemical lycopene is what gives tomatoes its red color and is a well-studied antioxidant. AICR's expert report found that foods containing lycopene protect against prostate cancer.

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