img

Sign Up For Email Updates:

WCRF/AICR
Global Network

From the AICR Test Kitchen

A Scintillating Soup

From the AICR Test KitchenMoroccan Lentil SoupThis savory, nourishing soup is the perfect antidote for mid-winter's chill. Three kinds of legumes—red lentils, garbanzos (chickpeas) and white cannellini beans—have different shapes and textures as well as cancer-fighting fiber and folate (a B vitamin) to boost your health. Red lentils are often used in North African, Middle Eastern and Indian cuisines—but you can substitute green lentils if you can't find red.

Spiced with warming ginger, an ingredient that supplies a cancer-fighting phytochemical called gingerol, plus other delectable Indian seasonings, this hearty soup also features fresh garlic, carrots, onions, celery and tomatoes. Eat it with a hunk of crusty whole-grain bread—or stir in a half-cup of brown rice to make it a complete meal that fortifies your immune system.

Moroccan Lentil Soup

Learn More

Watch our video on cooking beans.


Try this award winning Black Bean Brownie recipe submitted by one of our readers.


Read more about:

 

  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 medium yellow onions, chopped
  • 1 tsp. fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 3 cups water
  • 3 cups reduced-sodium vegetable broth (or chicken broth)
  • 1 cup red lentils
  • 1 (15 oz.) can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 (15 oz.) can garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 (15 oz.) can unsalted diced tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup celery, chopped
  • 1/2 cup diced carrots
  • 1 tsp. ground cardamom
  • 2 tsp. curry powder
  • 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

In large pot, sauté garlic, onions and ginger in olive oil for about 5 minutes.

Add all remaining ingredients and bring to a boil for 3 to 4 minutes. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Cover and simmer 30-40 minutes or until lentils are soft.

Puree approximately 1/3 of the soup.

Return the pureed soup to the pot, stir, reheat and serve.

Makes 10 servings.

Per serving: 180 calories, 2.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 29 g carbohydrates,
11 g protein, 7 g dietary fiber, 250 mg sodium.


Cooking Beans

AICR's Alice Bender, MS, RD, shows you how to take best advantage
of the flavor, texture–and cancer-fighting potential–of the humble bean.


All active news articles
]]