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Pasta Shells with Garlicky Kale

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November 19, 2013 | Issue 479

Super Side

Pasta Shells with
Garlicky Kale

Creamy pasta meets nutrition-packed kale in this recipe for the ultimate side dish. Kale’s popularity is rising, and with good reason – it’s super rich in vitamins A, C and K. Plus, research has shown that dark, leafy greens, like kale, pack a wide range of cancer-fighting carotenoids such as lutein and zeaxanthin. Pair with whole-wheat pasta shells and flavor with garlic and red pepper for a delicious addition to the table.

Makes 4 servings.

Per 1½ cups serving: 302 calories, 6 g total fat (1 g saturated fat),
56 g carbohydrate, 13 g protein, 7 g dietary fiber, 264 mg sodium.

  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes (or to taste)
  • 10-12 oz. (10-12 cups, loosely packed) pre-washed baby kale, coarsely chopped
 
  • 1/2 cup vegetable broth
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 Tbsp. Parmesan cheese
  • 8 oz. small whole-wheat pasta shells, cooked to package directions

Directions

  1. Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Sauté garlic with red pepper about 2 minutes.
  2. Stir in about half the greens, broth, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Increase heat to medium-high, cover, and cook until greens wilt, about 3 minutes. Stir in remaining greens, cover and cook an additional 12 minutes or until greens are tender. Stir occasionally.
  3. Place cooked, drained pasta in saucepan. Add greens mixture and gently toss until well combined.
  4. Sprinkle with cheese and serve.

Grocery list

Extra virgin olive oil
Garlic
Red pepper flakes
Kale
Vegetable broth
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Parmesan cheese
Whole-wheat pasta shells

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Recipe Extra:
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Did You Know?

Kale is in season all winter long. It’s is one of the few greens that actually tastes better after a frost.

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